A to Z Theme 2016

For my 2016 A to Z theme I used a meme that I ran across on the blog of Bridget Straub who first saw it on the blog of Paula Acton. This meme is a natural for me to use on my memoir blog. It's an A to Z concept and it's about me. No research and nothing complicated. I'm given twenty six questions or topics to discuss that are about me.

In April I kept my posts short and uncomplicated. In the midst of it all you might learn a few things about me that you didn't previously know.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Age #atozchallenge




A-Age : 

          When I was a kid or even a young man, the age 65 seemed like a faraway realm inhabited by grumpy coots, smug wealthy retirees, or grandpas.  The age of 65 seemed like a place so distant that I never much thought of being that old.  And yet here I am.  I'm 65 this year.

          Lately I've been thinking more about the implications of being 65.  I'm eligible for Medicare though I didn't sign up yet since I'm on my wife's healthcare plan.  I don't think of myself as grumpy or smug, and I'm certainly not wealthy.  But I am a grandpa with 5 grandkids now.  My wife will likely retire in two or three years and we'll have to come to a decision about what we'll do after that time.

          My mother was 85 when she died so I still have twenty years if I get that far.  My dad passed at only 67--this has become a sort of milestone that I feel I must cross over to have hopes of living as long as my maternal grandfather who passed at age 75.  We don't know when our time will come so I guess I can speculate about things like that and hope for the best.

          There's that saying about being only as old as you feel, but a lot of that depends on whether we're talking mind or body.  Most of the time I feel pretty good on both accounts and don't think much about my age.   Then there is that constant reminder that hangs over me--I'm 65 and not much I can do about it except enjoy life as best I can and expect that I'm going to live forever.  No point in giving up yet is how I see it.

          Do you worry about getting older?    Are there things you wish you had done in your life that you didn't do?   What do you plan on doing to make the best of your elderly years if you make it that far?





30 comments:

  1. You might want to check. I think you're required to sign up for Medicare. Some things aren't as important as we age. I'm happy to have more time to write (I have unfinished projects). I don't worry about traveling the world. Thought I would, retired. I like my home, although a trip is fine too. I regret letting my children move far away. Six grand kids but see only once or twice a year.

    Pioneer Women in Aviation A-Z

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    1. Sharon, they said I could opt out of the supplemental plans since I'm covered by my wife's insurance. I'm registered, but not officially covered my Medicare yet. When she retires then that will change. It's rough not seeing grandkids very often. That's my situation.

      Lee

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  2. I wish I'd traveled more instead of always being afraid about money. Now we are pretty much financially ruined with zero retirement and savings. It's a scary proposition.

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    1. JoJo, I was very fortunate to have a traveling job where all my expenses were paid. Due to poor planning though I'm in a similar financial condition as you describe.

      Lee

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  3. Hi Lee - live everyday and enjoy life ... and you've created something special in the A-Z ... and our blogs are here for that future time too ... I've had to withdraw .. but such is life sometimes and needs must - take care .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary, blogging has been a great find in my retirement.

      Lee

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  4. I'm 47 but I feel old. I feel like I'm semi-retired; having abandoned career at age 40 and living off a meager income in a role which allows me to do what I want with my time. But I need to lose a lot of weight or else health problems and their associated costs will derail this arrangement. One thing I know is that the past and future do not exist, that the present is real and presently we are both alive and that is an awful lot to be thankful for.

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    1. Fantasy guy, If your health goes it doesn't matter much what you have or don't have. I'm with you on that present philosophy.

      Lee

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  5. My dad promptly retired last year when he turned 65, but he's remained as busy as ever. Age is nothing to worry about.

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    1. Tony, my Dad worked up to a few months before he died, but he and my mother did a lot so they enjoyed their life together.

      Lee

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  6. Oh my ... such a thought-provoking post!
    I am 56. My dad died at 78 and Mom five years later. The way I see it, I have less than thirty years. I want to make the most of each of those years... I have to stop putting off tomorrow what I can (and want) to do today.

    Molly @MyCozyBookNook
    My Cozy Book Nook
    Revising Life after 50

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    1. Molly, yes, by all means get what you can done while you can. Our biggest regrets are the things we didn't do in our lives.

      Lee

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  7. I think we determined earlier that your dad and mine were the same age at death. My mom was my current age. I get to be the last of us kids to go through the "see if we make it past mom" thing.

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    1. CW, I guess it's kind of natural to put our lives in perspective to our parents' lives. I'm the oldest in my family so the others will have a ways to go. Now it's like a race that none of us wants to win.

      Lee

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  8. I'm still trying to deny that the parents have gotten older, let alone me!

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    1. Rebecca, it's easy to be kind of in denial about such things.

      Lee

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  9. For me, the threshold was 35, because that's when Dad died. It was the same for my brothers. Mom and her second husband both died at 68 (he was eight years older than she), so that's the next hurdle. I'd like to think I'll live as long as my grandfather, who was 96 when he died, but I think it'll be closer to my mother.

    I could write a book about all the things I wish I had done. #1 is take better care of myself.

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    1. John, 96 coupled with reasonable health would be a fine goal. Yeah, I know about that taking care of myself thing, but I had fun.

      Lee

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  10. Actually, I don't believe that this will be my #65 b-day in December. I am still about 35, altho my body denies it.

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    1. Susan K, I know. My body refuses to cooperate with my mind to, but now my mind is starting to give in.

      Lee

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  11. Ah! But we will live forever! This is not our home, we are only passing through!

    Revisit the Tender Years with me during the #AtoZChallenge at Life & Faith in Caneyhead!

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    1. Barbara, I hear you! But still...

      Lee

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  12. I try not to think too much about age anymore -- I'm almost 74, my dad passed away at 61 and my mom is still alive and on top of her mental game at almost 97. I'm just making it my goal to be as healthy as I can and hope for the best.

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    1. Patricia, no matter what we may plan, time and health may not always be on the same page as our minds.

      Lee

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  13. I used to. Back in my younger days I gave some thought about doing myself in at 30 (long warped logic behind it that I don't want to go into). Now, some 30+ years later, I'm looking forward to bothering other people until I shrivel up and fade away.

    Father Nature's Corner

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    1. GB, I had a friend who in high school used to say that on his 30th birthday he was going to kill himself and film it. He didn't but then later he died from an illness when he was about 45.

      Lee

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  14. I'm in your shoes. You certainly know you will not live forever. Oh well, time to live. We are lucky to have gotten this age. I won't say old. I'm not old. Just not as physically fit.

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    1. Ann, I'd like to live for many more years, but I don't think I could afford it and I'd probably stop feeling like it eventually. Like you say, I'm not all that physically fit either.

      Lee

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  15. I think I am better at being old than I was being young.

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    1. Patricia, being old is more natural to many of us. I wasn't so good at being young much of the time either.

      Lee

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